Thursday, July 20, 2017

Review: The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas


Rate:
5/5

Goodreads Description:
'On what slender threads do life and fortune hang'

Thrown in prison for a crime he has not committed, Edmond Dantès is confined to the grim fortress of Château d'If. There he learns of a great hoard of treasure hidden on the Isle of Monte Cristo and he becomes determined not only to escape, but also to unearth the treasure and use it to plot the destruction of the three men responsible for his incarceration. Dumas' epic tale of suffering and retribution, inspired by a real-life case of wrongful imprisonment, was a huge popular success when it was first serialised in the 1840s.

Review:
I can't believe I finished this!
AND THAT I ACTUALLY ENJOYED IT
One comment that probably isnt worth anything but holy shit this guy was fucking RICH! Like filthy rich! If he would be rich in todays terms, just imagine!
I started this book not knowing much about what type of language I would find, but excited for the story. It was surprisingly an easy read! At first, the book starts a bit slowly, not much is going on that kept me interested but I was determined to pull through it! And through it I did, it started to pick up for me to the point that I simply wasnt putting it down and I was staying up until midnight.. Except that last day, that one I fell asleep with the book in my face, 3 hours later.... Yeah, that was awkward.
I just LOVE the way Dantes took his time, and had patience to slowly destroy those that did him dirty, SLOWLY from the INSIDE!
Even then though, while Dantes might find something resembling peace, I dont think he ever is as happy as we was with Mercedes before the 3 stooges put him in jail and thats just sad. 
I loved this tale, it had everything that it needed to have, it was satisfying in a way that I was hopeing for but was still surprised by.
I am so glad this book came into my life.

Recommend it?
YUPS



Thursday, July 13, 2017

Review: It by Stephen King


Rate:
4/5

Goodreads Description:
“A landmark in American literature” (Chicago Sun-Times)—Stephen King’s #1 national bestseller about seven adults who return to their hometown to confront a nightmare they had first stumbled on as teenagers…an evil without a name: It.

Welcome to Derry, Maine. It’s a small city, a place as hauntingly familiar as your own hometown. Only in Derry the haunting is real.

They were seven teenagers when they first stumbled upon the horror. Now they are grown-up men and women who have gone out into the big world to gain success and happiness. But the promise they made twenty-eight years ago calls them reunite in the same place where, as teenagers, they battled an evil creature that preyed on the city’s children. Now, children are being murdered again and their repressed memories of that terrifying summer return as they prepare to once again battle the monster lurking in Derry’s sewers.

Readers of Stephen King know that Derry, Maine, is a place with a deep, dark hold on the author. It reappears in many of his books, including Bag of BonesHearts in Atlantis, and 11/22/63. But it all starts with It.

“Stephen King’s most mature work” (St. Petersburg Times), “It will overwhelm you… to be read in a well-lit room only” (Los Angeles Times).

Review:
This book is GRAPHIC! It is my best friends favorite book and I felt semi forced to read it after that fact and because of the movie coming out and I was simply left cringing at some scenes. Its just like HOW just HOW does he come up with half of the book or so many books at all! Its crazy. It also took some BALLS to really write some of the stuff going on in the books and I feel like that makes a huge part of its thriller portion.
BECAUSE of those cringing scenes, I also feel like the movie wont be done justice and hey, no one wants to see that anyways, but the movie is bound to be a lot freakier anyways because with just the clown description, it isnt 100% doing it for some people, even if they hate clowns like me. But then we see Skarsgaard in his clown make up and its like... Im not going to sleep in the next 100 years! 
I felt like the book had some slow scenes but then I picture them out of the book and its like no, it really takes away from it, Im glad they are in there. Like when its described when the kids are playing and making up games. Another thing that bothered me was the whole going back and forth in time, it kinda made it confusing for me and at the same time its like.. You know they are going to make it, I kinda wish the book was simply split in 2 and not mashed together. But then again, im not a legendary best selling author. So what do I know.

Recommend it?
Trigger warnings aside, yes.


Thursday, July 6, 2017

Review: Zenith by Sasha Alsberg and Lindsay Cummings


Rate:
2/5

Goodreads Description:
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

There is darkness sweeping across the stars. 

Most know Androma Racella as the Bloody Baroness: a powerful mercenary whose reign of terror stretches across the Mirabel Galaxy. To those aboard her fearsome glass starship the Maurader, she’s just Andi, their captain and protector. 

When a routine mission goes awry, the all-girl crew’s resilience is tested as they find themselves in a most unfamiliar place: at the mercy of a sadistic bounty hunter connected to Andi’s past and a harrowing betrayal. 

Meanwhile, on the far side of the galaxy, a ruthless ruler waits in the shadows of the planet Xen Ptera, biding her time to exact revenge for the destruction of her people. The final pieces of her deadly plan are about to fall into place, unleashing a plot that will tear Mirabel in two. 

Andi and her crew embark on a dangerous, soul-testing journey that could restore order to their ship—or just as easily start a war that will devour worlds. As the Marauder hurtles towards the unknown, and Mirabel hangs in the balance, the only thing certain is that in a galaxy run on lies and illusion, no one can be trusted. 

From internet sensation Sasha Alsberg and author Lindsay Cummings comes a new serialized space opera, full of action, fantastical intrigue, and steamy star-crossed romance. ​ 

For fans of popular sci-fi books and fantasy books for teens such as Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff, Wool by Hugh Howey, Truthwitch by Susan Dennard, and A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas.

Review:
DNF
Its not often that I don't finish a book but I had to for this one. Its a work in progress and thats why I went with 2 stars instead of 1. I think that if they changed a thing or 2 it could be a bit more original. There are things that could be easily likable but the way its written/done it was just like so many things already done before.
I dont think that I have even reviewed a DNF book but because this one is getting released as a full book and is getting edits done, I have some hope for this book series.

Recommend it?
mmmmm... Maybe wait for the finished book. 

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Review: Fitness Junkie by Lucy Sykes and Jo Piazza


Rate:
4/5

Goodreads Description:

When Janey Sweet, CEO of a couture wedding dress company, is photographed in the front row of a fashion show eating a bruffin--the delicious lovechild of a brioche and a muffin--her best friend and business partner, Beau, gives her an ultimatum: Lose thirty pounds or lose your job. Sure, Janey has gained some weight since her divorce, and no, her beautifully cut trousers don't fit like they used to, so Janey throws herself headlong into the world of the fitness revolution, signing up for a shockingly expensive workout pass, baring it all for Free the Nipple yoga, sweating through boot camp classes run by Sri Lankan militants and spinning to the screams of a Lycra-clad instructor with rage issues. At a juice shop she meets Jacob, a cute young guy who takes her dumpster-diving outside Whole Foods on their first date. At a shaman's tea ceremony she meets Hugh, a silver fox who holds her hand through an ayahuasca hallucination And at a secret exercise studio Janey meets Sara Strong, the wildly popular workout guru whose special dance routine has starlets and wealthy women flocking to her for results that seem too good to be true. As Janey eschews delicious carbs, pays thousands of dollars to charlatans, and is harassed by her very own fitness bracelet, she can't help but wonder: Did she really need to lose weight in the first place? 

A hilarious send-up of the health and wellness industry, Fitness Junkie is a glorious romp through the absurd landscape of our weight-obsessed culture.


Review: 
I really found myself enjoying this book from the first set of pages and also found myself disliking Beau.
Like he was the typical douch that let any sort of recognition get to his head and forget how he got there. The people that were there for him. Janey more than anyone. From Janey we see just how superficial society has gotten but also that hey, not everyone is bad, sure they want to fit in with the latest trends but for some, their heart is in the right place. As well as, hey, its okay to be happy just were you are at and to enjoy yourself once in a while. 
Now the weird personally thing was that I found myself wanting to eat the junkiest of junk while reading this and even as I write the review I am eating a muffin. Not a bruffin, but a dark double chocolate muffin xD I guess its because I kept reading about workouts and its like.. This counts as a work out right? I can treat myself now!

So you could say that im glad that I am done with the book.
I loved it, to be honest, its the perfect summer read.

Recommend it?
Yup I do!


Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Review: Dear Mr. M by Herman Koch


Rate:
3/5

Goodreads Description:
The tour-de-force, hair-raising new novel from Herman Koch, New York Times bestselling author of The Dinner and Summer House with Swimming Pool

Once a celebrated writer, M's greatest success came with a suspense novel based on a real-life disappearance. The book was called The Reckoning, and it told the story of Jan Landzaat, a history teacher who went missing one winter after his brief affair with Laura, his stunning pupil. Jan was last seen at the holiday cottage where Laura was staying with her new boyfriend. Upon publication, M.'s novel was a bestseller, one that marked his international breakthrough.

That was years ago, and now M.'s career is almost over as he fades increasingly into obscurity. But not when it comes to his bizarre, seemingly timid neighbor who keeps a close eye on him. Why? 

From various perspectives, Herman Koch tells the dark tale of a writer in decline, a teenage couple in love, a missing teacher, and a single book that entwines all of their fates. Thanks to The Reckoning, supposedly a work of fiction, everyone seems to be linked forever, until something unexpected spins the "story" off its rails. 

With racing tension, sardonic wit, and a world-renowned sharp eye for human failings, Herman Koch once again spares nothing and no one in his gripping new novel, a barbed tour de force suspending readers in the mysterious literary gray space between fact and fiction, promising to keep them awake at night, and justly paranoid in the merciless morning.

Review:
This book builds on the suspense from the very first set of pages.
It also starts to build on the plot in a way that for me, started to get a bit hard to keep up with what was going on.
Another thing that irked me was that sure, the suspense was building and I was like holy shit imma burst out of my seems but then it kinda start just bobbing along in a flatline until the end again and it irked me because I was like what if this is one of those stories that have a strong beginning and then suck!
Mean, I know.
But it DOES pick up as the climax reaches but even then, its not as entertaining as the beginning portion of the book. 


Thursday, June 22, 2017

Review: The Immortal life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot


Rate:
5/5

Goodreads Description:
Henrietta Lacks, as HeLa, is known to present-day scientists for her cells from cervical cancer. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells were taken without her knowledge and still live decades after her death. Cells descended from her may weigh more than 50M metric tons. 

HeLa cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer, viruses, and the atom bomb’s effects; helped lead to important advances like in vitro fertilization, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions. Yet Henrietta Lacks was buried in an unmarked grave.

The journey starts in the “colored” ward of Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1950s, her small, dying hometown of Clover, Virginia — wooden slave quarters, faith healings, and voodoo. Today are stark white laboratories with freezers full of HeLa cells, East Baltimore children and grandchildren live in obscurity, see no profits, and feel violated. The dark history of experimentation on African Americans helped lead to the birth of bioethics, and legal battles over whether we control the stuff we are made of.

Review:
Jesus this was such a wonderful book! There are a few set of books that I can consider worth it and this is one of them for sure. It was so interesting, informative and just something that deserves to be shared not just for information but for the recognition that the family of Henrietta and Henrietta herself deserve, particularly after how they were played. What are the chances in life that something like this is discovered, the effect that someone, that their insides, can have on the future! Not just a single person, a single family, but generations to come! How sad and weirdly ironic that she herself held what scientist needed to have been able to help save her.
This book covers a wide set of topics, ethics, science, racism, legality, technicalities and well... lots of ism and ities. 

Recommend it?
Freaking yes, this should be assigned reading. 


Thursday, June 15, 2017

Review: All the missing girls by Megan Miranda


Rate:
5/5

Goodreads Description:
Like the spellbinding psychological suspense in The Girl on the Train and Luckiest Girl Alive, Megan Miranda’s novel is a nail-biting, breathtaking story about the disappearances of two young women—a decade apart—told in reverse.

It’s been ten years since Nicolette Farrell left her rural hometown after her best friend, Corinne, disappeared from Cooley Ridge without a trace. Back again to tie up loose ends and care for her ailing father, Nic is soon plunged into a shocking drama that reawakens Corinne’s case and breaks open old wounds long since stitched.

The decade-old investigation focused on Nic, her brother Daniel, boyfriend Tyler, and Corinne’s boyfriend Jackson. Since then, only Nic has left Cooley Ridge. Daniel and his wife, Laura, are expecting a baby; Jackson works at the town bar; and Tyler is dating Annaleise Carter, Nic’s younger neighbor and the group’s alibi the night Corinne disappeared. Then, within days of Nic’s return, Annaleise goes missing.

Told backwards—Day 15 to Day 1—from the time Annaleise goes missing, Nic works to unravel the truth about her younger neighbor’s disappearance, revealing shocking truths about her friends, her family, and what really happened to Corinne that night ten years ago.

Like nothing you’ve ever read before, All the Missing Girls delivers in all the right ways. With twists and turns that lead down dark alleys and dead ends, you may think you’re walking a familiar path, but then Megan Miranda turns it all upside down and inside out and leaves us wondering just how far we would be willing to go to protect those we love.

Review:
This was such a good book, I can't believe I did not read it sooner. It took me a while to understand how the book was being doing, from later dates until the date of the disappearance, and I sure as heck wasn't expecting a bunch of the things that were happening. It's sad for me but so great at the same time. It made for an exciting book. This is a book I will shove in everyone's face and tell them to read it about 50 times. 
I love the way that Miranda developed her characters, it was just so good!
I cant, I sound like a broken record with this book I know. The book isn't lying when its somewhat compared to The Girl on the Train, its that addicting... Unless you didn't like that book, then you probably would like it either. The book itself reveals why the story is done in reverse but like the girl on the train you have your suspicions as to what happened to the missing girls, but you are never truly right and in the end, the most unexpected person did it. 

Recommend it?
Freaking yes, it has been a few days since I finished the book and as you can probably tell, I am still not able to put coherent thoughts together. 

Thursday, June 8, 2017

Review: The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman


Rate:
3.5/5

Goodreads Description:
Sussex, England. A middle-aged man returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral. Although the house he lived in is long gone, he is drawn to the farm at the end of the road, where, when he was seven, he encountered a most remarkable girl, Lettie Hempstock, and her mother and grandmother. He hasn't thought of Lettie in decades, and yet as he sits by the pond (a pond that she'd claimed was an ocean) behind the ramshackle old farmhouse, the unremembered past comes flooding back. And it is a past too strange, too frightening, too dangerous to have happened to anyone, let alone a small boy.

Forty years earlier, a man committed suicide in a stolen car at this farm at the end of the road. Like a fuse on a firework, his death lit a touchpaper and resonated in unimaginable ways. The darkness was unleashed, something scary and thoroughly incomprehensible to a little boy. And Lettie—magical, comforting, wise beyond her years—promised to protect him, no matter what.

A groundbreaking work from a master, The Ocean at the End of the Lane is told with a rare understanding of all that makes us human, and shows the power of stories to reveal and shelter us from the darkness inside and out. It is a stirring, terrifying, and elegiac fable as delicate as a butterfly's wing and as menacing as a knife in the dark.

Review:
The book reminded me a bit of Coraline in the aspect of creepiness surrounding kids. Not kid s themselves but things happening to them.

The things happening him as child were just so harsh but that is just the reality of things at times, and THAT is what pissed me off, that some parents would actually do things like that. The story could be a bit hard to follow at times and I don't know if this was because as a young kid he couldn't understand them himself or if this had to do with the writing in the book itself. This was my first Neil Gaiman book so I have nothing to compare it to yet, there is a long waiting list for his books so I will have to get back to you all on that. 
After a while I had actually forgot that there was a present and that there was a funeral which added to my confusion. 
The book was creepy in the part that this is a fear targeted more towards adults, things that if kids read it they wouldnt be as creeped out by it as we would be. Like Coraline, which by the way is also written by Gaiman, its has the aspect of your family not being your family, and as soon as you don't accept that, shit will go wrong.

Recommend it?
Yeah, it was enjoyable, a tad creepy and even though I was a tad confused at like 3 parts of the book, I still really dug it

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Review: Beautiful Creatures by Margaret Stohl and Kami Garcia


Rate:
5/5

Goodreads Description:
Lena Duchannes is unlike anyone the small Southern town of Gatlin has ever seen, and she's struggling to conceal her power, and a curse that has haunted her family for generations. But even within the overgrown gardens, murky swamps and crumbling graveyards of the forgotten South, a secret cannot stay hidden forever.

Ethan Wate, who has been counting the months until he can escape from Gatlin, is haunted by dreams of a beautiful girl he has never met. When Lena moves into the town's oldest and most infamous plantation, Ethan is inexplicably drawn to her and determined to uncover the connection between them.

In a town with no surprises, one secret could change everything.

Review:
So when the movie came out, I was all about reading the book first, to know what to expect. Which now a days if you have come across both you know that they are different.
Back then, the book was interesting enough to me but still not worth it enough to finish it. It was totally one of the first books that I bought for myself besides Twilight. And even then, my mom bought me Twilight after I asked for it. 

I have ALWAYS wanted to read this series but have never given myself the time to sit and actually get to it and even now, I went the audiobook route. I loved the audiobook, the extra effects that they add personally made the book a lot better when it came to feeling the things that Ethan felt, and saw and made it easier to understand, particularly when it came to the flashbacks and dreams, since the tone was different, it added the creepiness that it really should be. 
It made the experience really enjoyable.

Something I have always wondered is HOW in the world are teens in books and movies able to not just sneak in and out but sneak other people into their rooms and not get caught. Like HOW the living heck!
But thats not relevant
But seriously, someone tell me. 
Anyways, i devoured the book this time around, I thought that the book was simply enjoyable but no, I found myself going through 80% of the book in a single day and wouldve continued onwards if I wasnt so upset while studying for my calc test.
I would go ahead and rant on calc cuz it destroyed my life but what is the point. 
I can see why people love this series so much, I grew to care so much for the characters, for all of them really and I can't even place what it was about it that just drew me so much. 
I am such a fan now, if I didn't have a life changing test coming up.
The story was entertaining and so was the ending, the ending left with with a sense of satisfaction but knowing that there is more, I am more than eager to devour the world and know all about everyone in it. 

Recommend it?
Yes. I do, I really do.

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Review: Long Black Veil by Jennifer Finney Boylan


Rate:
3.5/5

Goodreads Description:
From the New York Times bestselling author of She’s Not There, a new novel about a woman whose family and identity are threatened by the secrets of her past.

Long Black Veil is the story of Judith Carrigan, whose past is dredged up when the body of her college friend Wailer is discovered 20 years after her disappearance in Philadelphia’s notorious and abandoned Eastern State Penitentiary. Judith is the only witness who can testify to the innocence of her friend Casey, who had married Wailer only days before her death. 

The only problem is that on that fateful night at the prison, Judith was a very different person from the woman she is today. In order to defend her old friend and uncover the truth of Wailer’s death, Judith must confront long-held and hard-won secrets that could cause her to lose the idyllic life she’s built for herself and her family.

Review:
I gotta say I was slightly reminded of it but only in a way that the past comes back to haunt them. The book was okay, I like the way the book was set up and the tone of it kept me interesting enough to continue onward with the book which lately has been happening to me that I just ditch books for a while before coming back to them way later. The author doesn't skirt around vocabulary and problems, she goes on about them without, to me, being overly offensive. She also doesn't seem to be conscious about this vocabulary but simply uses it for the sake of telling her story, not in a way that she WANTS readers to be triggered, or notice things on purpose.... I'm not making any sense, bear with me. 
I guess an example of it would be, naked people, people don't get triggered by naked people in art but if you see a naked person in public, they would. This book is taken in an artist form. Some people might like it, others might hate it, but the author did her work and created art out of work. And like any art, it can also be confusing which is why I ended up with a 3.5 rating because I found some parts of the plot to be a tad confusing and found myself having to go back a chapter 2 different times. 

Recommend it?
Yeah, it was interesting enough.

Thursday, May 25, 2017

Review: Understand by Ted Chiang


Rate:
3/5

Goodreads Description:
Leon is a former coma victim, who has gone experimental medical treatment to repair the massive trauma his brain received after he was trapped under ice for more than an hour. He’s regained consciousness, found he has all of his faculties back and a whole lot more. Originally published in Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine in 1991. 

Review:
I had high hopes for the ending, based on the middle of the book, which was super intense. It seems like all of Ted Chiangs' stories have an important moral and this one is along the lines of, aren't you glad there isn't a drug the will give you infinite knowledge. And its true, I mean, as annoying as not knowing things can be, knowing everything seems exciting, but would it really be? I mean then what, then there is nothing to look forward to. The whole story seemed to be leading to this life changing moment that I simply wanted to skip to but I was so disappointed, and the ending seemed dulled compared to the rest of the story. Can't wait to read the rest of his stories though.

Recommend it?
Ehm... Eh,,, Yeah, it was still very interesting.


Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Author Spotlight: A. V. Geiger Episode 16

Episode 16: A. V. Geiger

So as some people can probably relate, interviewing authors is so much fun, getting to know small details of the minds behind our favorite works. In this case, I got to peek into the mind of A. V. Geiger, author or the first book I read this read, I BINGED more like, it was such an amazing book.
Below you may find buy links and a few other extras!


A.V. Geiger is an epidemiologist who spends far too much spare time on social media. By day, she studies women’s psychiatric and reproductive health. By night, she can be found fangirling, following people back, and photoshopping the heads of band members onto the bodies of unicorns. Her writing career began with celebrity fan fiction, and her work draws extensively on her own experiences with online fan culture. Her original teen fiction has received millions of hits on the story-sharing website Wattpad, ranking as high as #1 in the mystery-thriller genre. She lives in New Jersey with her husband and twin boys.
Interview:

So Follow me Back will be your first official published novel, how did you feel when the news became official?

​It was an incredible feeling! I heard the news on a Monday morning, and I spent the rest of the day bursting into tears at random moments. The only problem was that I couldn't tell anyone right away. I had to wait a few weeks until the official announcement ran, and the secret nearly killed me.

V: That mustve been so hard to do, I wouldve been bursting at the seams.


Talk about a massive plot twist. Okay don't, let's not spoil. But how did you decide what changes to make?

​Follow Me Back went through several rounds of revisions from the Wattpad first draft to the final published version. There are ten totally new chapters in the published book that didn't appear on Wattpad. A lot of those changes were at the suggestion of my editor, but I also took notes from the comments left by Wattpad readers. There are over 90,000 comments to date, and I consider them my secret weapon. They give me all kind of information about what readers are thinking at every point in the story, so I know exactly when and where to throw a plot twist.

V: Wow, that is fantastic, I hadn't thought about it, what a wonderful way to edit xD over 90,000 bits of feedback xD

What sparked the idea of Follow me Back?

​When I first had the idea story, I was active in a real online fandom of a celebrity. I wanted to write a book about a fictional fandom that reflected my real experiences -- both forging online friendships with other fans and encountering plenty of online bad behavior.

V: it IS a cautionary tale.

Were any of the points of views easier than the other to write? If so, what do you think the reason for that was?

​Tessa, my female main character, was both easiest and hardest to write. Out of all the POVs, she is closest to my own voice, but she's also a flawed character with some unlikeable traits. Writing her chapters forced me to look critically at myself.

So You have written multiple novels on Wattpad (Adam_and_Jane), all of which have been well received, if you had to pick one world to live in that you have created, which one would it be?

That's a tough one! I don't like to play favorites among my books. My characters are like my babies, and I love them all in their own special way. That being said, I'd have to pick one of my fanfiction stories like Obsessed or Fill Me Up. Those books are pure wish-fulfillment romance, while my original stories like Follow Me Back and The Mermaid Hypothesis tend to be a bit darker.  

When you were writing Eric, was there any actor that you pictured in your head?

Readers are most welcome to picture whoever they like. For me, it was a young ​Zac Efron with a guitar.

V: Personally I pictured a young Henry Cavill.. Only because I love Henry Cavill.


What would you say the highlight/best part of this whole journey has been for you?

I hope the journey is just beginning! So far, the biggest thrill has been sharing the news about my publishing progress with my online readers. They've all been so supportive and excited for me every step of the way.

A message or idea you want readers to remember from this book?

It's important to remember that you never know who you're talking to online. My characters learn this lesson in more ways than one. They nearly write each other off and miss out on a great friendship due to the wrong assumptions they make about each other. On the other hand, both characters find themselves in real-life danger from people who initially seemed harmless online. Social media requires a tricky balance of open-mindedness and skepticism. You don't want to be too trusting or too closed off. I'm still figuring it out as an adult, and I hope my book encourages my teen readers to think about their own online behavior.

Follow Me Back


Goodreads Description:
Tessa Hart’s world feels very small. Confined to her bedroom with agoraphobia, her one escape is the online fandom for pop sensation Eric Thorn. When he tweets to his fans, it’s like his speaking directly to her…

Eric Thorn is frightened by his obsessive fans. They take their devotion way too far. It doesn’t help that his PR team keeps posting to encourage their fantasies.

When a fellow pop star is murdered at the hands of a fan, Eric knows he has to do something to shatter his online image fast—like take down one of his top Twitter followers. But Eric’s plan to troll @TessaHeartsEric unexpectedly evolves into an online relationship deeper than either could have imagined. And when the two arrange to meet IRL, what should have made for the world’s best episode of Catfish takes a deadly turn…

Told through tweets, direct messages, and police transcripts. 


BUY THE BOOK (Out on June 6th):

Advanced Praise:

"Geiger's social-media-saturated thriller (which fittingly got its start on Wattpad) should transfix teens for whom online relationships (romantic and otherwise) are integral parts of daily life, and catfishing and hacking are genuine fears." —Publisher's Weekly

"Follow Me Back is the perfect mix of fandom with just the right amount of suspense. An enthralling page turner from beginning to end." —Anna Todd, New York Times bestselling author of the After series.

 "Dark and suspenseful, Follow Me Back is sure to be the next big thing in YA Thrillers." —Ali Novak, author of The Heartbreak Chronicles and My Life with the Walter Boys

 "Follow Me Back is an unforgettable page-turner, and a cautionary tale for any fan who's ever wished that their favorite celebrity followed them on social media." —Sandy Hall, author of Signs Point to Yes and A Little Something Different


Thursday, May 18, 2017

Review: North of Happy by Adi Alsaid


Rate:
4/5

Goodreads Description:
New from critically acclaimed author of LET'S GET LOST and NEVER ALWAYS SOMETIMES. In the wake of his brother's untimely death, a teen chef runs away from home to find his true path in life.

Carlos Portillo has always led a privileged and sheltered life. A dual citizen of Mexico and the US, he lives in Mexico City with his wealthy family where he attends an elite international school. His friends and peers-fellow rich kids-have plans to attend college somewhere in the US or Europe and someday take over their parents' businesses. Always a rule follower and a parent pleaser, Carlos is more than happy to tread the well-worn path in front of him. He has always loved food and cooking, but his parents see it as just a hobby.

When his older brother, Felix--who has dropped out of college to live a life of travel--is tragically killed, Carlos begins hearing his brother's voice, giving him advice and pushing him to rebel against his father's plan for him. Worrying about his mental health, but knowing the voice is right, Carlos runs away to the US and manages to secure a job with his favorite celebrity chef. As he works to improve his skills in the kitchen and pursue his dream, he begins to fall for his boss's daughter--a fact that could end his career before it begins. Finally living for himself, Carlos must decide what's most important to him and where his true path really lies.
 

Review:
This book made me hungry.
There are recipes in every chapter and I decided to make sure that I mentioned those and give my thoughts on the chapter, simply a sentence or so but that will be at the bottom because of possible spoilers.
The way that Adi manages to describe food and the way that it makes  you feel when you try a particularly good dish was delicious. I could almost taste the food and I wanted nothing but to eat the food described. 
There isnt much description on the main character (Carlos) but that doesnt mean I didnt cast someone in my mind anyways.
Vadhir Derbez

I actually grew to care for Felix which is sad because you know... Hes dead. when Carlos talks about and picture Feliz, he is the type of guy we all wish we know and had in our life, someone that we know would make our life a little better, we would live vicariously through them.

With that said, I am NOT the type to be impulsive, so for Carlos to do what he did, it is an anxiety ridden thing for me to read. Because it is so freaking real! Adis topics are real, the characters are real, everything is real, its all real life things. 


Recommend it?
Yes, I do






Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Pre-Review: Goodbye Days by Jeff Zentner


Rate:
?/5

Goodreads Description:
What if you could spend one last day with someone you lost?

One day Carver Briggs had it all—three best friends, a supportive family, and a reputation as a talented writer at his high school, Nashville Academy for the Arts.

The next day he lost it all when he sent a simple text to his friend Mars, right before Mars, Eli, and Blake were killed in a car crash.

Now Carver can’t stop blaming himself for the accident, and he’s not the only one. Eli’s twin sister is trying to freeze him out of school with her death-ray stare. And Mars’s father, a powerful judge, is pressuring the district attorney to open a criminal investigation into Carver’s actions.

Luckily, Carver has some unexpected allies: Eli’s girlfriend, the only person to stand by him at school; Dr. Mendez, his new therapist; and Blake’s grandmother, who asks Carver to spend a Goodbye Day with her to share their memories and say a proper goodbye to his friend.

Soon the other families are asking for a Goodbye Day with Carver, but he’s unsure of their motives. Will they all be able to make peace with their losses, or will these Goodbye Days bring Carver one step closer to a complete breakdown or—even worse—prison?
 

Pre-Review:
I feel like this book will make me cry, that it will get super personal to me even though I dont have like.. a twin sister, not literally and things like that. But I have high hopes for this book, it just sounds so good and that is why I got it from Blogging for Books, so I am very excited about it for that. 
The fact that it involve texting while driving is such a good topic for me, not because I do it and thankfully not because I have lost someone, but because I always appreciate authors writing about real and current problems that often times are ignored, people don't want to talk about it or teens might not want to listen to because it comes from the news or things like that, its better to be able to relate to things than being told to do things.
So I am very excited and I can not wait to read it as soon as finals are over.