Thursday, March 23, 2017

Review: Before I Die by Jenny Downham


Rate:
5/5

Goodreads Descriptions:
Tessa has just months to live. Fighting back against hospital visits, endless tests, and drugs with excruciating side effects, Tessa compiles a list. It's her To Do Before I Die list. And number one is Sex. Released from the constraints of "normal" life, Tessa tastes new experiences to make her feel alive while her failing body struggles to keep up. Tessa's feelings, her relationships with her father and brother, her estranged mother, her best friend, and her new boyfriend, are all painfully crystallized in the precious weeks before Tessa's time runs out.

Review:
Jesus.  This one has been on my TBR for YEARS but had totally forgotten what it was about. As soon as I started I remembered Now is Good, with Dakota Fanning when I watched it on Netflix YEARS ago. I fucking BAWLED when I saw the movie and the book was no different. 

It is not sugar coated as many other books can be with this topic. 
To me, they bring an unrealistic view of the nastiness of the disease, how absolutely deteriorating it is. But this one brings the harsh truth to not just the main character but those around. Tessa is also not selfless like so many fucking characters out there where they simply seem perfect and shit. But Tessa isnt selfish either. She isn't annoying like that. She is a teen, she acts as any teen in her position would be acting and thats why I appreciate this book. I am the total opposite of her but she sure as hell acts the way I know I would.

Recommend it?
Very.

Monday, March 20, 2017

Review: Democracy in Black by Eddie S. Glaude Jr.


Rate:
5/5

Goodreads Description:

A powerful polemic on the state of black America that savages the idea of a post-racial society
 
America’s great promise of equality has always rung hollow in the ears of African Americans. But today the situation has grown even more dire. From the murders of black youth by the police, to the dismantling of the Voting Rights Act, to the disaster visited upon poor and middle-class black families by the Great Recession, it is clear that black America faces an emergency—at the very moment the election of the first black president has prompted many to believe we’ve solved America’s race problem.
 
Democracy in Black is Eddie S. Glaude Jr.'s impassioned response. Part manifesto, part history, part memoir, it argues that we live in a country founded on a “value gap”—with white lives valued more than others—that still distorts our politics today. Whether discussing why all Americans have racial habits that reinforce inequality, why black politics based on the civil-rights era have reached a dead end, or why only remaking democracy from the ground up can bring real change, Glaude crystallizes the untenable position of black America--and offers thoughts on a better way forward. Forceful in ideas and unsettling in its candor, Democracy In Black is a landmark book on race in America, one that promises to spark wide discussion as we move toward the end of our first black presidency. 


Review:
It is relevant with the times, or rather has been relevant since the inception of America but until recent years has been getting the attention has again that does not just deserve but NEEDS. Yet so many people are in the dark of what is really going on. Freedom is not a thing that is available to everyone. Yes ladies and gentlemen, freedom is not widely available for people IN THE UNITED STATES even today. It might not be as plainly obvious as it was over 150 years ago but it is all still very much there. This book touches and nails describing all the problems in todays society. This book needs to be in the hands of everyone.


Recommend it?

Yes

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Review: #famous by Jilly Gagnon


Rate:
5/5

Goodreads Description:
In this modern-day love story, Girl likes Boy, Girl takes photo of Boy and posts it online, Boy becomes accidentally insta-famous. And what starts out as an innocent joke spirals into a whirlwind adventure that could change both their lives—and their hearts—forever. But are fame and love worth the price?

Told in alternating points of view, #famous captures the out-of-control thrill ride of falling for someone in front of everyone.

Review:
I LOVED this book from the very beginning.
Throughout the whole book I couldn't help but think of this guy

Alex from Target anyone? 
Rachel and Kyle are charming and cute and goals.
In the book we also see Twitter as "Flit" and Ellen and Laura.
Rachel and Kyle live in a small town in Minnesota when Rachel posted a picture of Kyle at work with #idlikefrieswiththat directed to her best friend Mo but little did she know it was going to be blown out of proportion, leading to Kyle becoming crazy stupid famous overnight.
Which lets face it, is not far fetched at all.

I still don't understand how someone like that became famous, I mean.. trully now do many people become famous now a days.
There isn't, much to say on the characters besides the fact that they were likable and fun and that Jilly Gagnon made an incredible book and a super relatable character in Rachel.
Rachel was not the stereotypical perfect girl with perfect good looks. She had big curly hair, was curvy and wasnt secretly liked by all the boys around her. She was normal. Not popular and not unpopular.. just.. there. Which is what made me like her so much, I saw myself in her except .. Im taller and we have different hair colors xD

Recommend it?
I do. I really do.